BP Claims & GCCF hide behind OPA

The U.S. Oil Pollution Act, which requires companies to compensate people and businesses harmed by an offshore spill, makes clear that liability is “limited to damages directly caused by a covered oil spill and that indirect or derivative losses are not compensable,” BP said in papers filed yesterday in federal court in New Orleans.

BP said it isn’t responsible for damages to boats that participated in its VOO program or for the losses of Gulf Coast businesses idled by the U.S. deep-water drilling moratorium.

VOO gets dealt a blow by BP/GCCF

In March, hundreds of boat owners and contractors who participated in cleaning up the BP spill filed a master complaint seeking compensation for unpaid wages, vessel damage and physical injuries from contact with the spilled oil or chemical dispersants used to break up the oil. BP yesterday asked the federal court in New Orleans overseeing spill suits to dismiss claims by these plaintiffs under the Oil Pollution Act.

We will see how BP handles these claims through the GCCF process, they also went on to tell Louisiana that they needed to go through the GCCF process before they sue BP.

GCCF Uses Delay, Deny, Defend strategy again

If you all remember, and I am trying to emphasize this, the GCCF and BP are using a Delay, Deny, Defend strategy. If the GCCF and BP wanted to pay people they would be. They are following the text book of how to handle situations such as this. The book was written by unscrupulous insurance companies, and is often implemented when companies are trying not to pay, and it works. The GCCF could be more consistent and kind when it comes to paying BP Claims.

The good new is, some of the lawyers we have connected with will take these GCCF claims.